Internship program asian development bank

Internship Program

The Internship Program is a project-oriented learning opportunity for graduate students to gain experience through research assignments based on ADB’s current operational needs. ADB advertises internship assignments three times per year and welcomes motivated, open-minded, and self-directed individuals to apply.

The internship program offers the opportunity to:

  • work in a major international development organization;
  • work collaboratively with experienced professionals from over 50 different countries;
  • gain a deeper understanding of development finance and the impact of the work ADB does; and
  • contribute to ADB's business through research outputs.

Internship candidates must:

  • be enrolled in a Master's- or PhD-level program at a school in one of the ADB member nations, both prior to and after the internship assignment;
  • be engaged in academic study in a field directly related to ADB's work;
  • be a national of one of ADB's members ;
  • possess an excellent command of English; and
  • have professional experience relevant to the assignment.

*** ADB does not accept applications from close relatives of ADB personnel.

The internship application process is online through the ADB Recruitment Center. School registration and nomination is no longer required.

Application for the 2014 Internship Program is closed.

Selection Process

Eligible candidates apply through the ADB Recruitment Center (ARC) .

  1. ADB announces the assignments on the website and candidates choose assignments of interest.
  2. Candidates apply through ARC, prepare for their CVs and answer the essay questions.
    • All documents (CV and Essay) are uploaded to ARC to complete application.
    • Applications submitted after the deadline will not be considered.
  3. ADB evaluates applications based on: eligibility requirements, relevance of academic study and work experience; and the level of interest and motivation to contribute to development work. ADB also considers institutional representation, gender, and nationality balance in the over-all intern selection process.

Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Teaching and education jobs from education america network

International Job Seeker Services

Non-American job seekers can now register with Education America Network. There is a fee of $24.95 /annum to register with our site. By paying the fee you will receive the following information and services:

Please note. if you are a citizen of the United States or permanent resident there is no fee for you to register and apply to jobs. Click here to create an account.

  • Receive information on teaching in the United States
  • Receive immigration information
  • Ability to create a search profile and upload your resume
  • Ability to upload a cover letter and up to 10 other professional documents
  • Your profile will be made available for employers in the United States to search and review
  • Ability to create a jobbot that will notify you of new jobs posted by employers who accept international applicants
  • Search, browse and apply to jobs in the United States from employer who accept international applicants
  • Receive notification when a new employer who accepts international applicants joins our site

To complete your registration close this window and return to our registration page. On our registration page fill out the provided form and click on the “Register” button. Once you click on the “Register” button, you will be taken to a payment window. When your payment has been authorized you will receive an email that will allow you to verify and activate your account. Once your account is activated you will get an email with information on teaching and living in the United States. You will also be able to access the above services like uploading your resume and applying to jobs from employers who accept international applicants.

Disclaimer: By paying the registration fee and creating your profile on our site there is no guarantee that you will secure employment or the necessary permits to come and work in the United States. If an employer accepts international applicants, it is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that their credentials are valid in the State jurisdiction of the employer.

If you have any questions please email us at international_js@educationamerica.net .

Journal of mathematics teacher education incl option to publish open access

Editorial Board

  • Seeks to improve the education of mathematics teachers and develop teaching methods that better enable mathematics students to learn
  • Covers all stages of the professional development of mathematics teachers and teacher-educators
  • Examines institutional, societal, and cultural influences that impact on teachers’ learning and their students’ learning

The Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education (JMTE) is devoted to research that seeks to improve the education of mathematics teachers and develop teaching methods that better enable mathematics students to learn. The journal covers all stages of the professional development of mathematics teachers and teacher-educators. It serves as a forum for examining institutional, societal, and cultural influences that impact on teachers’ learning and ultimately their students’ learning.

Papers are published in one of three JMTE sections. Research papers reflect the main topics of the journal and go beyond local or national interest. Mathematics Teacher Education Around the World focuses on programs and issues of national significance that may be of wider interest or influence. Reader Commentary consists of short contributions that may offer a response to a published paper or develop an idea. The journal also publishes critiques of relevant reports and books.

Abstracted/Indexed in

SCOPUS, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, EBSCO, Academic OneFile, CSA Environmental Sciences, Educational Research Abstracts Online (ERA), Educational Technology Abstracts, ERIC System Database, ERIH, Gale, MathEDUC, OCLC, SCImago, Summon by ProQuest, Vocational Education and Training Abstracts

2014 it internships in new york ny

2014 IT Internships in New York, NY

IT Internships

Find a 2014 it Internship in New York, NY. Things are better than ever for people interested in working with computers: as technology continues to advance, more people are needed to work in the field of information technology. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that for IT, “employment is expected to grow much faster than the average, and job prospects should be excellent.” So if you want to get into a rapidly-expanding industry, then look into IT internships.

Since there’s such a demand for people in this industry, when you intern in IT you’ll actually get to work on serious, impactful projects, giving you the opportunity to make a difference at the company. Many IT interns are known to get independence to work on their own individual projects, which is something not every field can boast. So, if you’re searching for both freedom and support in your career pursuits, look no further because you have just found IT internships.

Teaching jobs in canada powered by education canada network

International Job Seeker Services

Non-Canadian job seekers can register with Education Canada Network. There is a fee of $24.95 USD to register with our site. By paying the fee you will receive the following information and services:

  • Receive information on teaching in Canada
  • Receive immigration information
  • Ability to create a search profile and upload your resume
  • Ability to upload a cover letter and up to 10 other professional documents
  • Your profile will be made available for employers in Canada to search and review
  • Ability to create a jobbot which will notify you of new jobs posted by employers who accept international applicants
  • Ability to create a jobbot which will notify you of new jobs posted by employers who accept international applicants
  • Receive notification when a new employer who accepts international applicants joins our site

To complete your registration close this window and return to the our registration page. On our registration page fill out the provided form and click on the “Register” button. Once you click on the “Register” button, you will be taken to a payment window. When your payment has been authorized you will receive an email that will allow you to verify and activate your account. Once your account is activated you will get an email with information on teaching in Canada and living here, as well as you be able to access the above services like uploading your resume and applying to jobs from employers who accept international applicants.

Disclaimer: By paying the registration fee and creating your profile on our site there is no guarantee that you will secure employment or the necessary permits to come and work in Canada. If an employer accepts international applicants, it will the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that their credentials are valid in the provincial/territorial jurisdiction of the employer.

If you have any questions please email us at international_js@educationcanada.com .

Please note. if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident there is no fee for you to register and apply to jobs. Click here to create an account.

The 6 hottest new jobs in it information technology careers infoworld

The 6 hottest new jobs in IT

Enterprise technology is getting more social, more business-focused, and more obsessed with the cloud. Here are six opportunities worth chasing

IT job seekers have real reason to hope. No fewer than 10,000 IT jobs were added to payrolls in May alone, according to the Bureau of Labor statistics, reflecting a steady month-over-month increase since January. And in a June survey by the IT jobs site Dice.com, 65 percent of hiring managers and recruiters said they will hire more tech professionals in the second half of 2011 than in the previous six months.

But which jobs have the greatest growth potential — and stand the best chance of withstanding outsourcing or another economic downturn?

[ Also on InfoWorld: Get out of your career rut! Check out the 10 U.S. cities with the highest-paying IT jobs. | Get sage advice on IT careers and management from Bob Lewis in InfoWorld’s Advice Line blog and newsletter. ]

To find those hottest of hot jobs, we’ve scoured listings on IT hiring sites like Dice and Modis and talked with IT execs about the skills they’re looking for in the year to come. Our sources point to a cluster of new job titles created to make IT more agile, more social — and more tightly intertwined with business.

Our results are not scientific. The six job titles you see here have actually been listed, but we didn’t choose them based on frequency of appearance or random sample polling. Instead, we picked them because we think they answer the real needs of businesses that want to prepare for the future. In short, we expect they will pay well, have staying power, and truly influence the organization either now or in the future. When’s the last time you heard that about a job in IT?

Hot IT job No. 1: Business architect

The notion that IT is separate from business has faded into antiquity. Upper management recognizes that technology is not just integral to success, but actually drives the way companies pursue their business goals. To help merge technology and business processes, a new breed of enterprise architect — known as the business architect — is emerging.

“Business architecture is about making sure the whole business holds together,” says Forrester Research analyst Alex Cullen, who researches IT strategy and organizational planning. “It’s a role built around business planning, pointing out opportunities to utilize IT more effectively” in sales, customer service, and other key areas.

Unlike the traditional enterprise architect, whose role is to organize technology to meet business goals, the business architect is a member of the business organization, reporting to the CEO and fashioning high-level company strategy with technology in mind. The successful business architect has a deeper knowledge of the company’s business model and workflow than the average enterprise architect. Think MBA with an IT focus.

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  • 20 movies every educator should see edutopia

    20 Movies Every Educator Should See

    Val Kilmer is very funny in this movie. He mentors a young kid who skips ahead to college. It’s interesting to see what the pressure of being a “genius” can sometimes do to a person.

    This has an all-star cast dealing with bigotry during the 1950’s. Even though it deals with anti-Semitism, the story truly applies to all types of discrimination students might face in schools.

    The reason this movie is on the list is because I feel it nailed the type of relationship young boys have at a particular age. JJ Abrams did an amazing job of writing exactly how young boys act when they are goofing around or when there is a girl in their midst. When dealing with boys in the classroom, this movie might help you make sense of their actions.

    This is another example of boys being boys, but also young kids being forced to deal with unfair expectations or labels based on their families. Whether it’s not living up to your all-star brother or trying to escape the reputation of a criminal brother, fighting to be yourself is never easy.

    What other movies would you add to this list? Please add to the comments section below.

    Comments (136) Sign in or register to post Subscribe to comments via RSS

    Community Manager at Edutopia

    Thank you everyone for your recommendations. Here are a few more that came in via email:

    Shorouq wants to add “Dangerous Minds” to the list saying that the movie touched his heart. In the film, Michelle Pfeiffer plays an ex-marine teacher who struggles to connect with her students in an inner city school.

    And finally, Sofia recommends “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie”, which won Maggie Smith an Academy Award for her role as a headstrong young teacher in a private school in 1930s Edinburgh.

    Getting your head around student loans american student assistance

    Types of Student Loans

    Before you borrow, make sure you know the basic types of student loans. That way, you will maximize the amount of federal aid you receive—and minimize what you have to repay later.

    • Stafford loans are the most common federal education loans students receive. They can be either subsidized or unsubsidized.
    • Perkins loans are low-interest federal loans, administered by the school, for students who demonstrate exceptional financial need.
    • PLUS loans can cover expenses not met by other federal financial aid. These can be taken out by dependent students’ parents or by graduate students.
    • Consolidation loans combine one or more pre-existing loans into one new loan with a fixed interest rate and (generally) a longer term.
    • Institutional loans are non-federal aid that schools loan their students.
    • Private loans and state loans are not federal aid—however, they can help students ineligible for federal aid or those who do not receive enough aid to cover the cost of attendance.

    Subsidized Stafford Loans

    Who Can Borrow

    Students who demonstrate financial need and are:

    • U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens.
    • Enrolled at least half time in an eligible degree or certificate program.  

    Loan Limits

    Undergraduate independent and dependent students can borrow a maximum of $23,000. This includes:

    • Up to $3,500 in their first year.
    • Up to $4,500 in their second year.
    • Up to $5,500 in their third year and beyond.

    As of July 1, 2012, graduate students can no longer receive Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans. They are still eligible for Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans.

    Repayment Terms

    • Repayment begins 6 months after the borrower initially graduates, withdraws, or drops below half-time enrollment.
    • Under certain conditions, the borrower can request a deferment —a repayment postponement—during which the federal government will pay your accruing interest on your behalf .
    • Borrowers also may be able to postpone repayment of their loan payments with forbearance. However, interest still accrues and will capitalize if you do not pay it during forbearance.
    • Typically, you have up to 10 years to complete repayment; however borrowers can also choose from various repayment plans .
    • There are no penalties for prepayment or finishing repayment ahead of schedule.

    Interest Payment

    Interest is generally paid by the federal government while you are:

    • In school.
    • In a grace period. However, subsidized student loans for which the first disbursement is made on or after July 1, 2012, and before July 1, 2014 are NOT eligible for the interest subsidy during the grace period. This means that you will be responsible for the interest that accrues during this time. During the grace period, payments are optional, but any interest that builds up will be added to the principal amount of your loan (capitalized) when the grace period ends.
    • In an approved deferment period.

    Interest Rate

    For undergraduates:

    • Loans disbursed before July 1, 2008, and loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2012 have an interest rate of 6.8%.
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2008, and before July 1, 2009, have an interest rate of 6%.  
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2009, and before July 1, 2010, have an interest rate of 5.6%.  
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2010, and before July 1, 2011, have an interest rate of 4.5%. 
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2011, and before July 1, 2013, have an interest rate of 3.4%. 
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2013, and before July 1, 2014, have an interest rate of 3.9%.

    Since July 1, 2012, Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans have been unavailable for graduate study. Earlier graduate student subsidized loans have a fixed interest rate of 6.8%.

    If you have loans disbursed prior to July 1, 2006, contact your loan holder for interest rate information.  Many loans made before this time have a variable interest rate that changes annually.

    Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

    Who Can Borrow

    Students who are:

    • U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens.
    • Enrolled at least half time in an eligible degree or certificate program.

    Unsubsidized Stafford loans are not based on financial need.

    Loan Limits

    Dependent Undergraduate Students

    Each year, dependent undergraduate students can borrow a base amount in either subsidized or unsubsidized Stafford loans. The loan type depends on the student’s need, which is calculated by the U.S. Department of Education.

    The base amount can be:

    • Up to $3,500 in the borrower’s first year of school.
    • Up to $4,500 in the second year.
    • Up to $5,500 in the third year and beyond.

    However, if the student’s aid has not exceeded the cost of attendance, the student can be eligible for up to an additional $2,000 per year in unsubsidized funds.

    With an additional $2,000 unsubsidized loan per year, dependent undergraduate students can borrow up to a maximum of $31,000 in Stafford loans. Of that $31,000, no more than $23,000 may be in subsidized funds.

    Undergraduate Independent Students and Dependent Students Whose Parents Are Unable to Obtain a PLUS Loan

    Undergraduate independent students and dependent students whose parents are unable to obtain a PLUS loan can borrow a base amount of Stafford loans. These can be either subsidized or unsubsidized, depending on the student’s need.

    The base amount can be:

    • Up to $3,500 in their first year of school.
    • Up to $4,500 in their second year.
    • Up to $5,500 in their third year and beyond.

    Additionally, if the student’s aid has not exceeded the cost of attendance, the student can be eligible for unsubsidized funds of:

    • Up to an additional $6,000 in their first and second years.
    • Up to an additional $7,000 in their third year and beyond.

    Undergraduate independent students and dependent students whose parents are denied PLUS loans can borrow up to a maximum of $57,500 in Stafford loans.

    Graduate Students

    • As of July 1, 2012, all Stafford loans for graduate students are unsubsidized.
    • Students may borrow up to $20,500 per year. 
    • Total Stafford loans, including undergraduate loans, may not exceed $138,500.
    • There are different aggregate borrowing limits for health profession students .

    Repayment Terms

    • Repayment begins 6 months after the borrower graduates, withdraws, or drops below half-time enrollment.
    • Typically, the borrower has up to 10 years to complete repayment; however borrowers can choose from various repayment plans .
    • There are no penalties for prepayment or finishing repayment ahead of schedule.
    • Under certain conditions, repayment of a borrower’s loans can be postponed with a deferment or forbearance. Interest will continue to accrue during periods of deferment or forbearance.

    Interest Rate

    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2006 and before July 1, 2013, have an interest rate of 6.8% for undergraduate and graduate loans.
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2013 and before July 1, 2014, have an interest rate of 3.9% for undergraduate unsubsidized Stafford loans.
    • Loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2013 and before July 1, 2014, have an interest rate of 5.4% for graduate unsubsidized Stafford loans.
    • Interest accrues upon disbursement of loan funds and can be paid monthly or quarterly during the in-school period .
    • The borrower can choose to allow interest to accrue while in school, but interest will be capitalized, which means it is added to the principal (the base amount borrowed).

    Perkins Loans

    Who Can Borrow

    Undergraduate and graduate students who demonstrate exceptional financial need and are:

    • U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens.
    • Enrolled at least half time in an eligible degree or certificate program.

    Loan Limits

    Repayment Terms

    • Repayment begins 9 months after a borrower graduates, withdraws, or falls below half-time enrollment.
    • The borrower has up to 10 years to complete repayment.
    • Borrowers receive limited  options for repayment schedules, but they do have additional postponement options like Perkins-specific deferments and forbearance.
    • Borrowers should contact their school or servicer to apply for a postponement.
    • Your servicer is usually different from your other federal loans. It could be your school or a company chosen by your school.

    Interest

    The interest rate is fixed at 5%. Interest is paid by the federal government while the borrower is:

    • In school.
    • In a grace period.
    • In an approved deferment period.

    Parent PLUS Loans  

    Who Can Borrow

    Natural or adoptive parents or stepparents (in some cases) and legal guardians of eligible dependent undergraduate students who are:

    • U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens.
    • Enrolled at least half time in an eligible degree or certificate program.

    Borrowers must have credit in good standing. A co-signer may be required.

    Parent PLUS loans are not based on financial need.

    Loan Limits

    Parents can borrow up to the total cost of attendance at the student’s school (as determined by the school), minus all other aid received.

    These loans have no annual or total borrowing limit.

    Repayment Terms

    Typically, borrowers have up to 10 years to complete repayment; however borrowers can choose from various repayment plans .

    There are no penalties for prepayment or finishing repayment ahead of schedule.

    Under certain conditions, borrowers can postpone repayment by requesting a deferment or forbearance. Interest will continue to accrue during periods of deferment or forbearance.

    For loans disbursed before July 1, 2008:

    • Repayment begins on the loan’s principal and interest as soon as it is fully disbursed.

    For loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2008, the borrower can choose to start repayment:

    • No later than 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed.
    • Upon request, 6 months after the student for whom the loan was borrowed graduates, withdraws, or d rops below half-time enrollment.

    Some Parent PLUS loans taken prior to July 1, 1993 may also be eligible for in-school deferment.

    Interest Rate

    • All Parent PLUS loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2010, and before July 1, 2013, have a fixed interest rate of 7.9%. 
    • Parent PLUS loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2013 and before July 1, 2014, have an interest rate of 6.4%.
    • PLUS loans originated under the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) had a fixed interest rate of 8.5%. As of July 1, 2010, there are no new FFELP loans . 

    Grad PLUS Loans

    Who Can Borrow

    Credit-worthy graduate or professional student s who are U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens and e nrolled at least half time in an eligible degree or certificate program. A co-signer may be required.

    Loan Limits

    Borrowers can borrow up to the total cost of their education, minus all other aid received.

    These loans have no annual or total borrowing limit.

    Repayment Terms

    For loans disbursed before July 1, 2008:

    • No payments are required while the borrower is in-school at least half time.
    • If the borrower graduates, withdraws, or drops below half-time enrollment, there is no grace period before repayment begins.

    For loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2008:

    Under certain conditions, borrowers can postpone repayment by requesting a deferment or forbearance. Interest will continue to accrue during periods of deferment or forbearance .

    Interest Rate

    • FFELP PLUS loans made on or after July 1, 2006 and before July 1, 2010 have a fixed interest rate of 8.5%.
    • Grad PLUS loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2010, and before July 1, 2013, have a fixed interest rate of 7.9%.
    • Grad PLUS loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2013, and before July 1, 2014, have an interest rate of 6.4%.

    Required web design education and experience

    How to Become a Professional Web Developer

    There are lots of ways to get the education and experience needed to become a professional Web designer or developer. But there are some basics that you should know in order to get a job so that you can gain the experience needed for more advanced jobs.

    Basic Web Development Knowledge You’ll Need

    Some people will tell you that because WYSIWYG programs are so wide-spread, you don’t need to learn HTML, but unless you’re going to stay in business for yourself, eventually you will come across a hiring manager or firm who wants you to prove you know HTML. Beyond that, HTML is the backbone of Web design, and if you know how Web pages are put together, you will be better at the job – even with a WYSIWYG editor.

    • 8 Ways to Learn HTML
  • CSS

    Cascading style sheets are what make your pages look good. And even if you’re planning on doing more Web programming than Web design, you should know how CSS works. The content and behaviors of the Web page interact with the CSS to create the full design, and CSS can become very complicated.

    • 8 Ways to Learn CSS
  • Basic JavaScript

    Most Web designers never learn any JavaScript, and this can hurt them in their careers. I can’t tell you how often I’ve been asked to write a quick validation script or rollover image. Knowing enough JavaScript to whip these out has helped me to improve simple Web sites while we waited for the more complicated server behaviors to be built.

    • Javascript 101 from JavaScript @ About.com
  • Keep in mind that when it comes to general education and experience, most large companies will want you to have a Bachelor’s degree. Small companies don’t care as much, but they also don’t always pay as well.

    But that’s not all you should learn. Web development jobs often require or request that you have other education and experience, depending upon the type of job you’re applying for.

    Web Designer Education and Experience

    Web designers should focus their education on design – graphics and layout. Most companies hiring designers want people who are visually artistic. You should study color theory and composition and get a degree in visual arts or visual design.

    Focus your education on design and less on building Web pages specifically. The sad fact is that most Web designers have spent a lot more time learning HTML and how to use Dreamweaver than they have learning anything about white space and creating a design that flows. If you get educated in classical design techniques and skills and then learn how to apply them to Web pages you will stand out as a designer.

    Most companies looking for Web designers will want to see a portfolio of sites that you’ve designed. Be sure to keep screen shots and color prints of the designs you’ve worked on – even if they were just class projects or sites you built for yourself. Try to have a diverse portfolio that shows more than just the front page of any site, and remember that your designs won’t remain on a site forever, so keep your own copies.

    Web Programmer Education and Experience

    Web programmers focus on the behavior of Web sites – many companies don’t hire Web programmers specifically, but rather software developers who are skilled at a specific programming language. The most common languages used by corporations on the Web are: PHP, JSP, and ASP.

    Web programmers do best when they get a computer science degree. It used to be possible to get a Web programming position without a degree in computer science, but the level of programming required for most enterprise Web sites demands highly skilled computer science professionals.

    Don’t focus on any one programming language. Chances are, by the time you finish school, that language will be “out” and something completely different will be “in”. Companies follow fads just as much as any other industry, and Web programmers need to be aware of what’s hot and not. You’re better off learning how to learn programming languages and then scanning the jobs 6 months or so before you are going to start working to find out what language you should focus on to get hired. Some good bets right now are: ASP, JSP, and Ruby. PHP is popular with smaller companies, but has a lot of security issues.